Tag Archives: Book Review

The Joy of Work by Bruce Daisley – A Book Review

Following on from my review of March’s BIMA Liverpool event featuring Bruce Daisley, who is Twitter’s European Vice-President, I have recently finished reading The Joy of Work. This was a book that offers several fun and imaginative ways to enhance the workplace culture of businesses, which made an incredible impression on me.

I enjoy reading books about business, self-help and personal development. From contemporary to classics, I have read several titles from authors such as Tony Buzan, Stephen Covey, Dale Carnegie, Napoleon Hill and Professor Steve Peters. After reading The Joy of Work, I can honestly say it is up there with the best of them, as I found it to be a delightful read, and full of ideas to improve workplace culture. Even better is that the ideas listed are fun, sensible and practical, whilst also based on solid and meticulous research.

The book is structured into three parts, which are Recharge, Sync and Buzz. Recharge looks at twelve ways to help in making you feel happier about your work. With Sync, this looks at eight ways to make teams closer, whilst Buzz looks at ten secrets of teams that are motivated and energised in what they do. Each of the three parts is broken down and clearly explained in simple terms, which are straightforward to understand and easily digest.

There was plenty I learned from reading the book. In fact, there is so much to share that I could write forever, which is why I have listed the key learnings below that I have learned and that resonate with me.

  1. Get a good night’s sleep.
  2. Concentrate on one task at a time.
  3. Go for lunch away from your desk.
  4. Ban phones from meetings.
  5. Remember to know when to leave people alone.
  6. Suggest a tea break and laugh.
  7. Focus on issues and not on people.
  8. Have pre-mortems, rather than post-mortems.
  9. Champion diversity.
  10. Admit when you have made a mistake.

From the points listed above and more, I was able to understand how work can be joyful and fulfilling. The book has also reiterated what I learned at the BIMA event about creativity suffering when under pressure, and what can be done for it to thrive in the workplace.

It has given me plenty to think about, and I have since successfully applied some of Bruce’s suggestions to my professional life. These include focusing on issues faced, being honest about mistakes made, and having lunch away from the desk during lunch breaks. By applying these ideas, I have been able to maintain a positive attitude to my work, as well as learning from my experiences to develop as a person.

If I could conclude with why I recommend this book, it is for the following reasons. Firstly, it is intelligently written and concise, making it easy to read and understand. Secondly the ideas suggested are simple ones, which can be tried and applied to your organisation. Finally, these ideas can also be applied by anyone, from office workers, cleaners, shop workers, CEOs, managers, company directors, entrepreneurs and many others.

I recommend purchasing the book from Amazon, any other bookstore, or even download the Kindle version. You can also download the audiobook from the iTunes Store. I have since downloaded and listened to the audiobook, and I enjoyed listening to Bruce speaking the words. Suffice to say The Joy of Work is now a permanent fixture in my collection.

If you enjoy Bruce’s book, you can also listen to his highly successful Eat Sleep Work Repeat business podcast.

Advertisements

World in Motion by Simon Hart – A Book Review

As a Liverpool supporter, I enjoy reading autobiographies of great players including Sir Kenny Dalglish, Steven Gerrard and John Barnes, as well as other football books that look at Liverpool’s history. In addition, I also enjoy reading about international football, including the England national team and the World Cup.

As I write this, the 2018 World Cup in Russia is currently taking centre stage, which has already seen a number of surprises. During matches, I have just finished reading World in Motion by Simon Hart, which looks at the inside story of the 1990 World Cup in Italy, and how its impact changed football forever.

Once I started reading, I was hooked and absorbed by how the book painted a fascinating and colourful picture of Italia 90. From Gazza’s tears, England’s journey to self-final heartbreak, to the emergence of Cameroon, Costa Rica and the Republic of Ireland on the World Cup stage, the book chronicles a tournament put to the memorable sounds of New Order’s World in Motion.

World in Motion is more than just about football. Instead it leads you on a journey through a period in history, before the age of the Premier League, and the evolution of the game into the billion-pound industry that we know today. Told through interviews with key players from Italia 90, the book explores and vividly describes the experiences, emotions and circumstances of the players, supporters and countries, at a time of change with the Cold War ending, the Berlin Wall falling down, and cultural barriers between East and West disappearing.

The interviews themselves are a tremendous collection of anecdotes, which are funny, entertaining, yet also poignant reminders of a different time. From all over the world, these interviews include several key players from Italia 90, including Cameron’s Roger Milla, Italy’s star striker and World Cup leading scorer Toto Schillaci, and also England’s Terry Butcher, team captain on that dramatic Turin semi-final against West Germany.

I found the players stories to be very interesting, with some making me laugh, and also thinking about what if results had turned out differently. Indeed there were several times, when I thought about those two words “what if”. These include what if Paul Gascoigne hadn’t been booked, what if Stuart Pearce and Chris Waddle had scored in that heartbreaking penalty shootout, what if Cameroon had gone further, or what if Yugoslavia had beaten Argentina. Reading the book, there were so many moments that made me think about “what if”, which is one of the reasons why I loved World in Motion as a book.

Overall I found World in Motion to be a superb engrossing read, well researched and put together by Simon Hart, with the interviews giving this book a big heart, and a strong sense of nostalgia. If you are a football fan, I wholeheartedly recommend it, as it captures the spirit and essence of Italia 90. For those who remember watching the tournament, every one of the 384 pages will take you back in time, to those hot summer days of Italia 90.

To conclude this review, I would like to leave you with a montage of Italia 90, put to the memorable music of Luciano Pavarotti’s Nessun Dorma.

Hope it brings back the memories!

Ciao!