Category Archives: Art & Culture

Ignite Liverpool 19th September – A Review

Liverpool is a city bursting with creativity. With storytellers of innovative and many creative minds, full of stories and interesting projects, there is so much Liverpool has to offer. Some local gems however lie beneath the surface like hidden treasure just waiting to be discovered.

I am saying this because I would like to share with you my thoughts on last month’s Ignite Liverpool event at Leaf on Bold Street, which I attended for the very first time. Similar to TED Talks, Ignite Liverpool is a bi-monthly event that allows creators, innovators, shakers, thinkers, dreamers, and other storytellers and doers, a five minute opportunity each to speak about a subject they are passionate about. As somebody who enjoys listening to stories, I was only too delighted to listen, and I was not disappointed by the content.

What impressed me greatly was the wide and eclectic mix of people who spoke about various subjects. Each talk was different and interesting, with topics ranging from the Kalman Filter, the Wapentake of Wirral, the hidden history of the Argentine Tango, and the connection between the 3’Ps (Palm Oil, Peanut Butter and Peat) and the loss of habitat for orangutans in the Tropics. Looking back, I found these to be enlightening and interesting enough to give me food for thought for some creative ideas, that I may even consider writing or talking about in the future.

I can honestly say that attending Ignite Liverpool was a worthwhile experience, which I gladly recommend to anyone. Just to hear so many stories from members of the community from all walks of life, who spoke about their subjects with passion and also emotion at times, is a wonderful reminder of why I love the city of Liverpool.

To conclude, I shall say that if you love watching TED Talks and being inspired by new ideas, then Ignite Liverpool is too good an opportunity to miss. For me personally, I am looking forward to attending more of these events, and to be creatively inspired.

You can even view a recording of the event on Ignite Liverpool’s official YouTube channel.

Enjoy and be inspired!

Advertisements

World in Motion by Simon Hart – A Book Review

As a Liverpool supporter, I enjoy reading autobiographies of great players including Sir Kenny Dalglish, Steven Gerrard and John Barnes, as well as other football books that look at Liverpool’s history. In addition, I also enjoy reading about international football, including the England national team and the World Cup.

As I write this, the 2018 World Cup in Russia is currently taking centre stage, which has already seen a number of surprises. During matches, I have just finished reading World in Motion by Simon Hart, which looks at the inside story of the 1990 World Cup in Italy, and how its impact changed football forever.

Once I started reading, I was hooked and absorbed by how the book painted a fascinating and colourful picture of Italia 90. From Gazza’s tears, England’s journey to self-final heartbreak, to the emergence of Cameroon, Costa Rica and the Republic of Ireland on the World Cup stage, the book chronicles a tournament put to the memorable sounds of New Order’s World in Motion.

World in Motion is more than just about football. Instead it leads you on a journey through a period in history, before the age of the Premier League, and the evolution of the game into the billion-pound industry that we know today. Told through interviews with key players from Italia 90, the book explores and vividly describes the experiences, emotions and circumstances of the players, supporters and countries, at a time of change with the Cold War ending, the Berlin Wall falling down, and cultural barriers between East and West disappearing.

The interviews themselves are a tremendous collection of anecdotes, which are funny, entertaining, yet also poignant reminders of a different time. From all over the world, these interviews include several key players from Italia 90, including Cameron’s Roger Milla, Italy’s star striker and World Cup leading scorer Toto Schillaci, and also England’s Terry Butcher, team captain on that dramatic Turin semi-final against West Germany.

I found the players stories to be very interesting, with some making me laugh, and also thinking about what if results had turned out differently. Indeed there were several times, when I thought about those two words “what if”. These include what if Paul Gascoigne hadn’t been booked, what if Stuart Pearce and Chris Waddle had scored in that heartbreaking penalty shootout, what if Cameroon had gone further, or what if Yugoslavia had beaten Argentina. Reading the book, there were so many moments that made me think about “what if”, which is one of the reasons why I loved World in Motion as a book.

Overall I found World in Motion to be a superb engrossing read, well researched and put together by Simon Hart, with the interviews giving this book a big heart, and a strong sense of nostalgia. If you are a football fan, I wholeheartedly recommend it, as it captures the spirit and essence of Italia 90. For those who remember watching the tournament, every one of the 384 pages will take you back in time, to those hot summer days of Italia 90.

To conclude this review, I would like to leave you with a montage of Italia 90, put to the memorable music of Luciano Pavarotti’s Nessun Dorma.

Hope it brings back the memories!

Ciao!

Weightmans Wednesday – Capital of Culture 10th Anniversary

2018 marks a decade since Liverpool was voted European Capital of Culture. Since 2008, it has transformed the city, and like millions of others, I have seen this through my own eyes, filling my heart with nothing but pride.

Last month, I had the pleasure of attending an event held at Weightmans LLP in Liverpool. The event featured an interesting presentation from Robin Kemp of Culture Liverpool, about Capital of Culture’s impact on the city, the upcoming 10th anniversary, and of the future cultural plans for Liverpool.

There was a rich tapestry of information that I learned about Capital of Culture. From the success of events such as the Giants Spectacular, Three Cunard Queens, Liverpool Biennial and Liverpool Pride, the effects of such a prestigious accolade cannot be underestimated. The impact of Capital of Culture, has boosted the local economy, and increased the city’s tourism profile, culminating in Liverpool being named as one of the top holiday destinations to visit in 2018.

Robin also briefly talked about Liverpool 2018, which is a year-long festival of programmes. The purpose of Liverpool 2018 is to celebrate the city’s cultural and creative heritage, and also to plan for and build upon the next decade. The festival includes events such as the Chinese Terracotta Warriors, Three Festivals Tall Ships Regatta, Bordeaux Wine Festival, Future World of Work, Liverpool International Music Festival 2018 and many more interesting events. Looking at what Liverpool 2018 offers, this promises to be a creative, innovative and thought-provoking programme, which will showcase the city’s creativity to a national and international audience.

Capital of Culture has also helped Liverpool to attract new investment. This is evident through the development and success of major conference attractions held at ECHO Arena Liverpool and Exhibition Centre Liverpool, which has attracted major UK and international events. Such examples including the 2016 Labour Party Conference, MTV European Music Awards 2008, BBC Sports Personality of the Year, and the International Business Festival, amongst many other high profile events.

To conclude, I would like to express my thanks to Robin for giving a great presentation, and for whetting my cultural appetite. Finally I would also like to thank everyone at Weightmans, for organising an entertaining evening of culture, networking and conversation.

Bring on the next ten years, and beyond!

Rhymes & Records at the Jacaranda – Monday 7th August 2017

Writing and performing poetry is one of my favourite hobbies. Just the thought of creating a piece and reciting it to an audience of like-minded people, is an obsession that fills me with nothing but plentiful joy.

Last week, I attended an open mic night called Rhymes & Records, held in the basement of The Jacaranda. Located on Slater Street in the Ropewalks area of Liverpool, I was unaware of the famous historical significance of The Jacaranda. This was because it was one of the early venues where The Beatles played, so the location was very intimate, as the audience were sat very close to the stage.

I had never previously been to Rhymes & Records or The Jacaranda, so I was surprised with the layout and design of the basement. As I stood on the stage reciting my poems, I felt the buzzing anticipation and warmth supportive feel of the audience, and my fellow poets. It was a wonderful and uplifting atmosphere, which is a very special feeling. An added bonus was that I even managed to thankfully avoid bumping my head against the low ceiling!

In addition, I was impressed with everyone who got on the stage to read out their poems. It takes courage for a person to stand in front of a microphone, and read out a poem they have written to an audience of strangers, especially when it has been written from the heart, and of a personal nature.

There were so many poems related to different subjects, which made the audience laugh, contemplate and cry. These included subjects such as past nostalgic times, as well as serious topics including mental health, LGBT issues and also about grief. This last subject was magnificently covered by Christina Thatcher, who was headlining the evening. Christina performed some poems from her book “More Than You Were”, related to her own personal experiences with grief, which she performed so beautifully, that I was mesmerised and emotionally moved by her performance.

In conclusion, Rhymes & Records was an excellent evening, and I would like to thank Lyndsay Price for organising and hosting the event. My thanks also go to Christina for sharing her wonderful poetry, all the poets who performed, and to the audience for their support.

I recommend Rhymes & Records for an entertaining evening of poetry, of which more details can be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Weightmans Wednesday – National Museums Liverpool

At last week’s Weightmans Wednesday, I was delighted to listen to Fiona Philpott and Sandra Penketh from National Museums Liverpool (NML). This is a group that consists of 8 free museums and galleries, providing various historical, geographical and contemporary collections and exhibitions. These venues include the Museum of Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery and the World Museum, employing 450 full-time staff.

Listening to Fiona and Sandra, I learned about how successful NML has been for the city. This is because MNL’s economic impact on the Liverpool City Region cannot be underestimated, with 3 million visitors attending the city’s museums and galleries each year, contributing £53 million to the local economy.

NML’s success is down to the tremendous effort put in behind the scenes. Organising successful exhibitions require painstaking negotiations with domestic and international partners, devising alternative ways to maximise resources, and identifying what exhibitions will be effective to reach audiences. In addition to the above, having good background knowledge of subjects related to exhibitions, is also very important.

I also learned from Fiona and Sandra about NML’s willingness to try new things. A classic example is by encouraging and providing creative opportunities for contemporary artists, through the John Moores Painting Prize, which invites contemporary painters to submit and display their works. NML also strongly values the importance of education by working with schools and communities, and promoting social change and equality, by tackling social, historical and contemporary issues. An example is their Pride and Prejudice research project, and the Art of Solidarity exhibition, which explores, educates and presents untold stories, through interactive and accessible means.

Fiona and Sandra also touched on some of the upcoming exhibitions. An example is the Terracotta Warriors, which is coming to Liverpool in 2018. Whilst I have already seen pictures of the exhibition, it has already attracted considerable media attention, and I also believe it to be a real coup for the city of Liverpool, to display this interesting exhibit. Therefore I sincerely hope the Terracotta Warriors exhibition proves to be a major success for NML.

I would like to personally thank Fiona and Sandra for providing a culturally enriching talk. My thanks also go to John Kemp, Henry Sterling and Sarah Gerard of Weightmans, for organising an entertaining evening of networking. My thanks also go to Prescient, for providing a sumptuous buffet, which complimented the experience.

To conclude, Liverpool is a city with plenty to offer from a cultural perspective. With a tremendous wealth of art and history exhibitions, there is so much to visit and learn, from the landmarks, museums and galleries across the city. NML provides many opportunities to educate and enrich the lives of everyone, making it a valuable asset to the city of Liverpool.

Personal Thoughts on 2016

2016 will be remembered for many things. From the European referendum, a new Conservative PM, party leadership wrangles, Donald Trump becoming the next US President, the perception of 2016 is of chaos, panic and serious worry. However, as I wrote about last month, it is important to retain perspective and appreciate the simple things in life.

Reflecting on the last twelve months, I feel satisfied with what I have experienced and achieved. This is because I have been through several experiences this year. Such examples include moving to a new IT role in LCC, taking part in a poetry slam, and running the Scouse 5k charity run. This has allowed me to push out of my comfort zone and learn new skills in the process, to grow personally and professionally.

I have also had the pleasure of attending many events. Examples include IFB2016, Weightmans, Downtown in Business, Professional Liverpool and others, where I have met, talked and listened to plenty of interesting people, from Liverpool and beyond. These include coaches, innovators, company directors, chief executives, marketeers, enthusiasts, artists, poets and other inspirational storytellers. It is has been delightful to listen, socialise and document my experiences in this blog. Therefore I wish to sincerely thank all who have inspired, encouraged and supported my blogging endeavours. Writing gives me great pleasure, and I am looking forward to publishing and sharing more in the future.

And what for 2017?

My intention is to continue pushing myself, by learning and growing to become the best I can be. This includes my work for LCC, my blog writing, poetry, helping others and devoting time to family and friends.

On a final note, I would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

See you all in 2017!

Weightmans Wednesday – Liverpool Biennial

The joys of working in Liverpool are that there is so much happening. From new hotels, bars, restaurants, businesses, to the cultural richness the city has to offer, I am constantly keen to discover and learn about the many opportunities happening in the city.

At last week’s Weightmans Wednesday event, I listened to a very interesting talk given by Julie Lomax, from Liverpool Biennial. In a previous article, I had written about the positive impact the festival has had on the city of Liverpool. However I had little understanding of the purpose behind the festival. By the end of the talk, my understanding of the Biennial was clearer.

Liverpool Biennial is more than just a free festival of contemporary national and international art. It is about representing Liverpool’s past, present and future, using imagery to express people’s stories and ideas. This is achieved through an eclectic mix of exhibitions, films, events and performances, held in the city’s public spaces, galleries, museums and unused buildings. What this achieves is three-dimensional visual spectacles, of fiction and storytelling that brings Liverpool’s history to life.

From the talk given by Julie, I learned that Liverpool Biennial works with major arts organisations in the city, including FACT, Bluecoat, TATE Liverpool, Open Eye Gallery, Walker Art Gallery and more. I also learned how this year’s festival used a format of six episodes, which took viewers on a journey, through Liverpool history and culture, with stories interwoven between venues, places and performances. Finally I also learned that Liverpool Biennial is already working towards 2018. Who knows what artistic wonders await the milestone of ten years, since Capital of Culture?

I came away from the event feeling enlightened. What impressed me is how the Biennial has breathed life into parts of Liverpool, once unused and neglected. In conclusion, Liverpool Biennial is an asset, as it contributes to the city, both in culture and commerce.

Finally I would like to thank Julie for a fine cultural discussion. My thanks also go to John Kemp and everyone at Weightmans for organising a splendid evening, and for their usual mix of kind professionalism and hospitality.